Tag: Wabi-Sabi

The Blacksmith’s Boy

Blacksmith’s Boy-Wayne Fettro
Blacksmith’s Boy-Wayne Fettro

Norman Rockwell’s oil painting: Blacksmith’s Boy-Heel and Toe was painted as an illustration for Edward W. O’Brien’s story by the same name in the 1940 issue of The Saturday Evening Post magazine

In 2003, local artist Wayne Fettro painted a partial reproduction on the side of this building in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. It can use a little touching up but I like it just the way it is.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Looks Like a Face

Wabi-Sabi

Wabi-Sabi?
Wabi-Sabi?

Wabi-sabi represents Japanese aesthetics and a Japanese world view centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

It is a concept derived from the Buddhist teaching of the three marks of existence, specifically impermanence, suffering and emptiness or absence of self-nature.

In this case, it’s a broken piano that was left outside the old Weavertown one room schoolhouse for over a year. I felt it was beautiful, imperfect and incomplete. As for it being impermanent, the schoolhouse is now an antique store and the piano is no longer there. Time marches on.