Category: Signs

The Scream

Just Mom's Ice Cream Poster
Just Mom’s Ice Cream Poster

I could have screamed, you could have screamed, we all could have screamed but Mom’s is closed for the season.

Update: Not only is Just Mom’s not closed for the season but I found out they serve homemade ice cream as well as a full menu of appetizers, lunch and dinner.

Kaytlyn D. of Douglassville, P.A. gave the place a five star review and said: “Excellent food. Excellent service. New addition is beautiful and clean. All hoagies/sandwiches and pastas are better than most in restaurants in the area. If you’re lucky enough to get Tarkus behind the bar, ask for a dirty martini.”

I’d ask for a dozen dirty martinis but I quit drinking about fifteen years ago. What about the ice cream Kaytlyn?

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Anything that is Hot and / or Cold

You Are What You Eat

Fancy feast
Fancy feast

Ernest Becker, the quintessential optimist and sometimes life of the party had a thing about worms. It’s possible that he was an avid fisherman or gardener, although there was no mention of that in his biography.

One of my favorite of his worm quotes is from a book he wrote that won the Pulitzer Prize back in 1974, The Denial of Death:

“What does it mean to be a self-conscious animal? The idea is ludicrous, if it is not monstrous. It means to know that one is food for worms. This is the terror: to have emerged from nothing, to have a name, consciousness of self, deep inner feelings, an excruciating inner yearning for life and self-expression and with all this yet to die.”

Reflecting on this has got me through many hours at the lake when the trout weren’t biting. But I think David Gerrold said the same thing in a better way: “Life is hard. Then you die. Then they throw dirt in your face. Then the worms eat you. Be grateful it happens in that order.”

Food for thought.

Unconditional Friendliness

Unconditional Unfriendliness
Unconditional Unfriendliness

Maitri is translated in a lot of ways, maybe most commonly as love, but the way Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche translated it was unconditional friendliness, and in particular unconditional friendliness to oneself.

I passed this sign today on the window of a store in downtown Lancaster city. As far as I can tell it’s a normal store selling cigarettes and Snapple among other things. But for some reason they do not want people to sit or stand.

Could their very unconditional unfriendliness be because in order to buy something people have to stand in the store, or do they make an exception for that? I wonder if their customers have a time limit, or do they run the place like the Soup Nazi where you go in, state your order and leave?

I was taking a photo and asked a man walking by if he would stand in front of the sign that said no standing. Maybe it was the police car a hundred yards away or maybe it was the bad karma of the place, but he said: “I ain’t standing nowhere for nobody.” Alrighty then.

Suzy Kassem, author of Rise Up and Salute the Sun once said: “To really change the world, we have to help people change the way they see things.” And as Trungpa Rinpoche always said, “Good luck, sweetheart.”