Category: Buddha

Monkey Mind

Monkey Mind
Monkey Mind

The Buddha said that we all have monkey minds, with dozens of monkeys all clamoring for attention. Fear and anxiety are very loud monkeys, pointing out all the things we should be wary of and everything that could go wrong.

Daniel B. Smith, author of the book Monkey Mind writes: “Admit the anxiety as an essential part of yourself and in exchange that anxiety will be converted into energy, unstable but manageable. Stop with the self-flagellating and become yourself, with scars and tics.”

In other words, everybody’s got something to hide, except for me and my monkeys.

Stormy Weather

It's just another day
It’s just another day

The horse might know the way but does he know about the coming storm? Depending on who you listen to, we have a winter storm warning with predicted snow, rain, more snow and temperatures dropping to 6 degrees with wind gusts of 30mph.

Unless he has a TV like Mister Ed, he probably has no idea and will get a good nights sleep then get up in the morning and go wherever he has to go. Unlike people, he doesn’t have the capacity to worry about a future which doesn’t exist.

Buddha (allegedly) said: “Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.” On the other hand, Alan Watts (allegedly) said: “This present moment never comes to be and it never ceases to be, it is simply our minds that construct the continuity of thoughts we call time.”

In my next life I’d like to come back as a horse despite Ernest Becker’s view of them as “living in a world without time, pulsating, as it were, in a state of dumb being.” Not an Amish plow horse in Pennsylvania but a wild horse living on the beach somewhere warm, maybe Utah. Ain’t never been there, they tell me it’s nice.

From the Withered Tree

The Withered Tree
The Withered Tree

The Buddha (allegedly) said: “From a withered tree, a flower blooms.” But what exactly does that mean? The best explanation I could find is on a site called Zen Dirt. This is from a post called From the Withered Tree:

“In Zen quotes and sayings, we have many reminders of the impermanence of everything. Life, as all things in the universe, exists in cycles and nothing is permanent. Being mindful of non-duality however, means that all things never cease to exist either. From a withered, old, lifeless tree, a new flower blooms, a new life grows. This reminds us of the cycle of life, of how we are all related, elder and young, old and new, and how we are all of the same being.

This quote also speaks of how beauty, new life, and new thoughts can blossom from an otherwise old, lifeless, withered tree. Just because a tree is shrunken and has been around a long time, doesn’t mean it doesn’t have the capacity to flower new life from it.

We can interpret this several ways. We can see this as a message that no matter what stage we are at in life, we can always start fresh. It’s never too late to let our lives blossom into a beautiful new flower. There is no such thing as “it’s too late now.”

As we all exist in cycles, we should not underestimate the profound effect of changing our lives and relationships with others. Even at a late stage in life we can positively affect our attitudes and the perspectives of those around us. This can ripple out and create positive energy around the world, or at the very least, the lives of the ones around us.

Another way to see it is simple. We were all young flowers, growing from the fruits of our parents, and we will all grow old, into a withered tree. Flowers may bloom from us, or they may not. This is not just children, the flowers are also seeds of happiness we plant in the hearts and minds of others.”

Zen Dirt-Fill your mind with emptiness

Ego Tripping at the Gates of Hell

Ego Tripping
Ego Tripping

“Nirvana is this moment seen directly. There is no where else than here. The only gate is now. The only doorway is your own body and mind.

There’s nowhere to go. There’s nothing else to be. There’s no destination. It’s not something to aim for in the afterlife. It’s simply the quality of this moment.” Buddha