The Camels of Lancaster County

I'd walk a mile...
I’d walk a mile…

Yes Virginia, there are camels in Lancaster County on a very large farm off Mill Creek School Road in Bird-In-Hand. I’ve been there before but the big ones always seem to be way off in the field doing whatever camels do.

Yesterday I was in the area, which is not far from the daring cow escape I witnessed on Friday, and discovered three baby camels frolicking just a few feet from the barn. This one may not look like a baby but a baby camel can weigh up to 90 pounds at birth, the other two were much smaller.

In the past I would have gladly walked a mile for three camels, maybe more if I knew they would be posing in good light. But they share the same problems with horses and Alpacas: crud in their eyes and unless it’s late in the season, flies all over those pretty faces.

At one point a tour bus called The Amish Experience pulled up and let three passengers off to take selfies. I thought nothing of it until one woman insisted on kissing the big one, not once but several times. I hope it was good for her because he seemed a bit confused by the whole thing.

I found out that these are dairy camels and are raised for their milk. Also available are camel milk yogurt and camel milk soap which is made by a local company. I didn’t really smell them but I’m pretty sure I don’t want to smell like a camel right out of the shower.

It’s really something to see if you’re not expecting it, but for a local like me it’s as normal as a tourist making out with one. Maybe they should set up a kissing booth because that tour bus passes by every day. It’s all good until someone gets their nose bit off though; I guess they could sign a waiver.

6 thoughts on “The Camels of Lancaster County

  1. Awesome!!! Problem with ruminants are the hazards of having cud — literally fermented stomach content, which they regurgitate and chew again . . . being spit in the unsuspecting tourist’s face. I hope you’re there to get that one on film :)) Love it!! Dawn

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  2. The camel milk yogurt and soap don’t smell anything – unless maker uses outrageous amount of camel milk powder. Actually, camel milk has a lesser smell than cow’s milk. The reason lies in the fat content. Camel milk is more watery so it tastes just plain with a slight salty taste. Cow’s milk is more “gamey” due to the fat content.
    We wouldn’t be supplying 5 star tourist hotels and resorts in the middle east if our ice cream stank, would we? 😉

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